Measles Investigation

Updates:
-- Case Counts
-- January 20, 2015
-- January 17, 2015
--
January 07, 2015

What is Measles?
What are it's symptoms?
What does measles look like?
How is it spread?
How long does it last?
How is it treated?
Should I see my doctor?
How can I best protect my family?
For more information

Case Counts
Updated: February 3, 2015
Total Cases: 3 confirmed cases (Utah County)

For updates on national cases, please see http://www.cdc.gov/measles/cases-outbreaks.html.

REPOSTED FROM http://health.utah.gov/epi/diseases/measles/outbreak.html

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Fourth case of measles RUMOR
There are only three confirmed cases of measles in Utah County at this time

PROVO, UTAH (January 20, 2015: 4pm) -- Social media is circulating a rumor of a fourth case of measles in Utah County. At this time, there are only three confirmed cases.

State and local public health officials currently have 66 individuals under "Active Monitoring" status -- meaning they have been exposed and we want to track them to be certain they don't develop measles and potentially expose others. These individuals are being asked to voluntarily quarantine themselves (meaning they stay home and limit their exposure to visitors), as well as monitor and report to public health officials on any symptoms they may have.

Utah public health does not classify "suspect" cases. While any of the 66 in active monitoring may yet be confirmed with the disease, it is also very likely that none of them will develop measles. The Utah County Health Department, Utah Department of Health, and other public health partners will continue to closely monitor and inform the public of new developments in the measles outbreak as they become available.

For updates on the measles outbreak in Utah County, please see check back here or follow #MeaslesUC on Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Third Utah Resident Tests Positive for Measles
New case was in contact with the two original cases -- no additional exposure sites listed due to effective quarantine

REPOSTED from the Utah Department of Health

SALT LAKE CITY (January 17, 2105) -- A third Utah County resident has tested positive for measles. The individual is under the age of 18 and was in contact with the two people who became ill after traveling to Disneyland and Disney California Adventure Park in mid-December. This person was unimmunized, but did receive an MMR vaccine after the original cases became ill. The three Utah cases are part of a larger outbreak being investigated in California.

The new case was under quarantine during their infectious period, and as a result, would not have exposed anyone else to the virus.

For more information about the current outbreak, visit: www.health.utah.gov/measles.

The best way to protect yourself and your family from measles -- as well as many other preventable diseases -- is to be fully immunized. Children and adults can receive vaccinations for diseases such as measles, pertussis, and influenza, which protect not only themselves, but helps to limit the spread of disease in the community. For general information on vaccines and vaccine preventable diseases, please visit www.immunize-utah.org, or call the Utah Department of Health Immunization hotline at 1-800-275-0659, or your local health department.

For information on immunization in Utah County, please see www.UtahCountyHealth.org/immunizations.

To hear the media conference held on January 7, 2015, please click here

Two Utah Residents Test Positive for Measles
Public health investigating possible additional exposures
#MeaslesUC on Facebook and Twitter

PROVO, UTAH (January 7, 2015) -- Two Utah County residents have tested positive for measles after traveling to Disneyland and Disney California Adventure Park in mid-December, where public health officials believe they were exposed to the virus. The two Utah cases are part of a larger outbreak being investigated in California. Public health officials there have confirmed seven total cases along with three suspect cases during the time period of December 15-20, 2014.

Individuals who came into contact with the two Utah cases may also have been exposed to the virus and public health officials are working to track down and notify these people.

The infected individuals in Utah County would have been contagious from December 27, 2014 through January 5, 2015 and attended several events during the infectious period. Public health is urging anyone who was present at any of the following locations at the specified dates and times to contact the Utah Poison Control Center, which is screening individuals for potential exposure, at 1-800-456-7707, or visit the web site www.health.utah.gov/measles:

  • FRIDAY, 12/26/14 - MACEY'S GROCERY STORE, OREM , 5:00 P.M. - 11:00 P.M.
  • FRIDAY, 12/26/14 - CINEMARK MOVIES 8, PROVO, 4:00 P.M. - 8 P.M.
  • FRIDAY, 12/26/14 - CARMIKE WYNNSONG 12, PROVO, 10:00 P.M. TO CLOSING
  • SUNDAY, 12/28/14 - GENEVA HEIGHTS LDS CHURCH BUILDING, 847 WEST 800 NORTH, OREM, 12:30 P.M. - 7:00 P.M.
  • MONDAY, 12/29/14 - WALMART, SANDHILL ROAD, OREM, 9:00 P.M. - 11:00 P.M.
  • FRIDAY, 1/2/15 - OREM COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, EAST ENTRANCE LOBBY, LAB OR GIFT SHOP, OREM, 4:30 P.M. - 7:00 P.M.
  • SATURDAY, 1/3/15 - TIMPANOGOS REGIONAL HOSPITAL, ER WAITING ROOM AND REGISTRATION DESK, OREM, 12:30 P.M. TO 3:30 P.M.
  • SATURDAY, 1/3/15 - TIMPANOGOS REGIONAL HOSPITAL LAB WAITING ROOM, OREM, 1:30 P.M. - 3:30 P.M.
  • SUNDAY, 1/4/15 - TIMPANOGOS REGIONAL HOSPITAL LAB WAITING ROOM, OREM , 1:45 P.M. - 3:45 P.M.

Public health officials need to know if people at these locations during the specified times are fully vaccinated in order to implement appropriate measures to contain the outbreak.

Individuals who were exposed to the virus and are not fully vaccinated will be asked to quarantine themselves in their homes until their infectious period has passed. This means no school, work, church, travel, outside contacts or community events for 21 days from the date of exposure to an infected individual.

To achieve maximum protection from the measles, individuals must receive two doses of the MMR vaccine. Those who haven't had two doses, or those who aren't sure if they are fully immunized, should contact their health care provider or their local health department. It is especially important for pregnant women, infants and people with weakened immune systems to be protected as these individuals may develop more severe illness.

Symptoms of measles include a fever of 101°F or higher, cough, runny nose and a rash that spreads to cover the body. The rash usually occurs within two weeks of exposure. The virus is transmitted by respiratory droplets from coughing or sneezing, and is so contagious that 90 percent of people in close contact with an infectious person will get the disease if they're not immunized.

If you develop symptoms, call your health care provider and let them know you may have the measles. It is important that you do not visit a physician's office, emergency room, lab or any medical clinic without first calling the facility and informing them of your exposure to measles. This will enable the facility to take the necessary precautions to protect other individuals from possible exposure.

The best way to protect yourself and your family from measles – as well as many other preventable diseases – is to be fully immunized. Children and adults can receive vaccinations for diseases such as measles, pertussis, and influenza, which protect not only themselves, but helps to limit the spread of disease in the community. For general information on vaccines and vaccine preventable diseases, please visit http://www.immunize-utah.org, or call the Utah Department of Health Immunization hotline at 1-800-275-0659, or your local health department.

# # #

The mission of the Utah Department of Health is to protect the public's health through preventing avoidable illness, injury, disability and premature death, assuring access to affordable, quality health care, and promoting healthy lifestyles.

The Utah County Health Department is committed to promoting the health of our community by preventing avoidable disease and injury by monitoring the health of our community, responding to public health emergencies, and assuring conditions in which people can be healthy.


Measles

Measles is a respiratory disease caused by a virus. It can cause fever, runny nose, cough and a rash all over the body. A vaccine has been available since the late 1960's, and is now given as a combination vaccine with mumps and rubella -- more commonly referred to as MMR -- at ages 12 to 15 months and a booster about age 4 to 5 years.

Thirty percent of those who get measles have complications that can include meningitis, pneumonia, seizures, encephalitis (swelling of the brain), blindness and brain damage. About one out of 1,000 gets encephalitis, and one or two out of 1,000 die. While measles is rarely seen in the United States, it still kills nearly 200,000 people each year around the world. Recent US outbreaks have been linked to international travel, and is often the result of no or incomplete vaccination.

Measles spreads through the air by breathing, coughing, or sneezing. It is so contagious that any individual who is exposed to it and is not immune is very likely to get the disease. It has an incubation period -- meaning the time between exposure and when individuals show symptoms -- of six to 18 days from patient exposure until individuals show symptoms. Individuals can pass the infection from four days prior to showing symptoms and until up to five days following the onset of the rash.

Signs and Symptoms

Measles typically begins with a mild to moderate fever, accompanied by other signs and symptoms, such as a persistent cough, runny nose, inflamed eyes (conjunctivitis) and sore throat. Two or three days later, Koplik spots — a characteristic sign of measles — appear inside the mouth.

Three to five days after the start of symptoms, a red or reddish-brown rash appears. The rash usually begins on a person's face at the hairline and spreads downward to the neck, trunk, arms, legs, and feet.

When the rash appears, a person's fever may spike to more than 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

measles
This is the skin of a patient after 3 days of measles infection. For a high resolution image, please click here. Image from CDC.gov/measles.
How is it spread?

Measles is highly contagious and can be spread to others from four days before to five days after the rash appears. Measles is so contagious that if one person has it, 90% of the people close to that person who are not immune will also become infected with the measles virus.

The virus lives in the mucus in the nose and throat of the infected person. When that person sneezes or coughs, droplets spray into the air and stay suspended in the air for hours. The droplets can get into other people's noses or throats when they breathe or put their fingers in their mouth or nose after touching an infected surface. The virus can live on infected surfaces for up to 2 hours.

Measles is a disease of humans; measles virus is not spread by any other animal species.

How is it treated?
Measles is a virial infection for which there are no anti-viral medications. Therefore, treatment is limited to symptomatic and supportive care only until the individuals own immune system is able to develop immunity to fight the virus.
Should I see my doctor?
Anyone experiencing severe symptoms should contact their doctor for further testing. Since measles is so infectious, it is very important to call your physician or clinic first BEFORE going in so proper precautions can be taken to minimize the spread of the disease to others at the doctor's office.
Precautions / Immunization

Measles is a highly contagious disease that is spread through airborne droplets from breathing, coughing or sneezing. The best form of prevention is full immunization. Measles is included in the MMR vaccine (Measles, Mumps and Robella). The CDC reports that individuals who receive a first MMR vaccine are 95% protected against measles. A second MMR provides 99.7% protection.

Vaccination within 72 hours of exposure to measles in unvaccinated persons can provide protection against measles in some cases. If immunization status is unknown, vaccination in an immune person is not harmful.

For more information:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):
http://www.cdc.gov/measles/index.html

Utah Department of Health (UDOH):
http://health.utah.gov

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